russian-style:

Pyotr Konchalovsky - Portrait of Vsevolod Meyerhold, 1938
The portrait was created not so long before the arrest and death of Russian theatre director Meyerhold, so there is a contrast between the vivid background and sadness  of removed master.

russian-style:

Pyotr Konchalovsky - Portrait of Vsevolod Meyerhold, 1938

The portrait was created not so long before the arrest and death of Russian theatre director Meyerhold, so there is a contrast between the vivid background and sadness  of removed master.

hismarmorealcalm:

Caryatids from the Acropolis being restored at Athens Museum

hismarmorealcalm:

Caryatids from the Acropolis being restored at Athens Museum

“[T]hose who defend war have invented a pleasant sounding vocabulary of abstractions in which to describe the process of mass murder.”
chimneyfish:


The Studio Wall, 1872
Adolph von Menzel

chimneyfish:

The Studio Wall, 1872

Adolph von Menzel

bulbs-for-pigs:

Adolph von Menzel (german, 1815-1905), the artist’s foot, 1876; oil on wood (38,5 cm x 33,5 cm)

bulbs-for-pigs:

Adolph von Menzel (german, 1815-1905), the artist’s foot, 1876; oil on wood (38,5 cm x 33,5 cm)

fleurdulys:

At the Beer Garden - Adolph von Menzel
19th century

fleurdulys:

At the Beer Garden - Adolph von Menzel

19th century

“Philosophy, if it cannot answer so many questions as we could wish, has at least the power of asking questions which increase the interest of the world, and show the strangeness and wonder lying just below the surface even in the commonest things of daily life.”
Bertrand Russell, The Problems of Philosophy (via fyp-philosophy)
kaiserohnepurpur:

A Flute Concert of Frederick the Great at Sanssouci, Adolph Menzel, 1850-52
142 x 205 cm. Staatliche Museen zu Berlin

kaiserohnepurpur:

A Flute Concert of Frederick the Great at Sanssouci, Adolph Menzel, 1850-52

142 x 205 cm. Staatliche Museen zu Berlin

dreamingofsanssouci:

A sketch of Frederick the Great by Adolf von Menzel.
Look at that swaggin’ pose. I don’t even know where to begin.

dreamingofsanssouci:

A sketch of Frederick the Great by Adolf von Menzel.

Look at that swaggin’ pose. I don’t even know where to begin.

deutschemark:

{King Friedrich II of Prussia, Margrave and Prince-Elector of Brandenburg, Prince of Neuchâtel - 1871 - Schwarzen Adlersaal, Stadtschloss, Berlin}

deutschemark:

{King Friedrich II of Prussia, Margrave and Prince-Elector of Brandenburg, Prince of Neuchâtel - 1871 - Schwarzen Adlersaal, Stadtschloss, Berlin}

“You don’t know this damned race.”

Frederick the Great, in response to someone saying that human nature was fundamentally good.

PREACH.

(via dreamingofsanssouci)

rococo-girls-shrine:

Hohenzollern castle in Germany is the ancestral seat of the Hohenzollern family, which emerged in the Middle Ages and eventually became Prussian emperors.

The castle is located on top of Berg (Mount) Hohenzollern at an elevation of 855 meters and was first constructed in the first part of the 11th century.

Among the historical artifacts of Prussian history contained in the castle today are the crown of Wilhelm II and some of the personal effects of Frederick the Great and a letter from US President George Washington thanking Baron von Steuben, a scion of the House of Hohenzollern, for his service in the American Revolutionary War. The castle is today a popular tourist destination.

electricspacekoolaid:

Ancient Egyptians Used Meteorites For Jewelry

Open University (OU) and University of Manchester researchers wrote in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science that they found proof that ancient Egyptians used meteorites to make accessories.

In 1911, archaeologists dug up strings of iron beads at the Gerzeh cemetery, about 43 miles south of Cairo. The Gerzeh bead is the earliest discovered use of iron by the Egyptians, dating back from 3350 to 3600 BC. The bead was originally thought to be from a meteorite based on its composition of nickel-rich iron, but scientists challenged this theory back in the 1980s. However, the latest research places this theory back on top.

The scientists used a combination of electron microscope and X-ray CT scanner analyses to demonstrate that the nickel-rich chemical composition of the bead confirms its meteorite origins.

Philip Withers, a professor of materials science at University of Manchester, said meteorites have a unique microstructural and chemical fingerprint because they cooled incredibly slowly as they traveled through space. He said it was interesting to find that fingerprint in the Gerzeh bead.

“This research highlights the application of modern technology to ancient materials not only to understand meteorites better but also to help us understand what ancient cultures considered these materials to be and the importance they placed upon them,” said Open University Project Officer Diane Johnson, who led the study.

 -Read More -